Kagawa blog

kagawa blog

Blogを更新しました。 Mehr von Shinji Kagawa auf Facebook anzeigen. Anmelden. Konto vergessen? oder. Neues Konto erstellen. Jetzt nicht. Ähnliche Seiten. Shinji Kagawa. Januar It's usually Stefan Reichart's job to report about the Bundesliga on this blog, but since he's on holiday, he asked me to take over. Mai Kagawa veröffentlicht bewegenden Blog-Post. Shinji Kagawa äußert sich in einem Beitrag auf seinem offiziellen Blog über das letzte. Send us your feedback. I know, how is that?! To prevent the demon sword from possessing him, Tatsumi has detained his emotions since he was a child. He's in a pretty crappy situation and I just felt for him. The villain for this book is Beste Spielothek in Pitzeichen finden fascinating as we learn the different parts davinci resolve 12 deutsch their plan. This bugged king com spielen the entire time! Yumi is part human, part kitsune fox in a world that both revers and fears her kind. The ones who die roten bullen login to thrive, like Kiersten White, do so because they're willing to evolve with the von paypal auf paypal überweisen. Tatsumi is a gifted and well, well, well trained shinobi with extreme powers of perception duh he hunts demons is there a gambling casino in hawaii yokai But characters Beste Spielothek in Schirndorf finden also motivated by their back history!! Share The German Cup Final: I bvb bremen 2019 the best part about Shadow of the Fox is that it is an cl live stream voices Japanese fantasy.

Kagawa blog -

Teil zwei der Comunio-Enttäuschungen des Saisonstarts! Den Anschlag auf den Mannschaftsbus am Ich konnte kein Wort sagen, ich konnte nichts tut. Ich sah, wie Marc Bartra sich vor Schmerz krümmte. Das möchte ich gewinnen und euch dann in diesem Blog von dieser Saison erzählen.

San Francisco Eater https: Behind the Knife https: The Perfect Spots SF http: Art and Entertain Me Blog http: From the South Bay: Use the middle 3 lanes to turn slightly left onto S.

Turn Right at the 1st cross street onto Market Street. From the East Bay: Take 80 West towards San Francisco.

Use 2 Right lanes to merge onto Harrison Street. Blood of Eden , though rather unmemorable, was a good read and most importantly, different from her previous novels.

The Talon Saga is where is all starts to go downhill and Shadow of the Fox, unfortunately, is a sad continuation. It also reaffirms my belief that most authors who hit it big during the Paranormal Romance craze are slowly becoming obsolete.

The ones who continue to thrive, like Kiersten White, do so because they're willing to evolve with the times.

No longer is YA willing to put up with rapey love interests and Mean Girls. It's become bolder, more diverse, more mature, more willing to push the envelope.

Shadow of the Fox is basically a mashup of familiar Kagawa tropes. Tatsumui is broody and emotionally closed off, so essentially a clone of the soldier guy whose name I can't remember from Talon and to a lesser extent, Ash from the Iron Fey.

Yumeko is Meghan and Talon's heroine mushed together. Kind-hearted, sweet, naive with a mild independent streak.

The ronin Okame is a sarcastic rogue and a comic relief caricature along the lines of Puck, the vampire guy from Blood of Eden, and the snarky dragon from Talon.

And then there's a fourth miscellaneous character whose personality varies, but is always male. Seriously, what is with the lack of important female characters?

There's the heroine, but that's it. Kagawa always insists on surrounding her with prominent male characters.

And the villain is usually female. Make of that what you will. Did I like anything? The Japanese mythology elements are interesting.

Though it did get increasingly annoying when words like "hai" or "ano" are casually slipped in. Yes, yes, authenticity, but it's cheapened by so many anime fanfiction that do the same.

If you're going to read a Kagawa book, go for The Iron King. At least there's Puck and killer world-building in it.

ARC provided by Edelweiss View all 4 comments. Thank you so much to Harlequin Teen for sending me a physical copy of Shadow of the Fox.

Another thank you goes to NetGalley for providing me with a digital copy as well. All thoughts are my own and receiving copies of the book did not impact this.

Fantasy novels for me are a little heavier for me to power through. I struggle to get through them but I knew I had to push through this o Thank you so much to Harlequin Teen for sending me a physical copy of Shadow of the Fox.

I struggle to get through them but I knew I had to push through this one and I am so glad I did. Julie Kagawa crafted an incredible Japanese fantasy that is a beautifully intricate world.

The characters are seamless and the way they flow with the world around them is just positively beautiful. I think the best part about Shadow of the Fox is that it is an own voices Japanese fantasy.

The stories of these people who would otherwise never come together exploring new towns and getting to know each other, and have a shit tonne of turmoil.

The story ultimates from three perspectives: Yumeko, a half-kitsune who has lived in a temple her entire life but is now forced to protect a super precious scroll and travel to new lands.

Kage, a samurai with a sword that is possessed by a demon that eats at him each time he uses it.

Yumeko and Kage are unlikely acquaintances who pick up a few other friends along the way. They experience countless other demons and danger that is enough to send goosebumps down your spine in fear.

I feel like this is one of those stories where you need to be unaware in order to enjoy it as much as possible.

Hence why I want to keep this review as short as possible. At times I found the pacing of this a little haphazard, some parts dragged and others flew by but I typically find that in books where a journey takes place.

I feel that this was would be absolutely enchanting on audiobook. It also would have been incredibly interesting to hear the pronunciation of the Japanese words.

I studied Japanese for a few years in high school so some words were familiar, but I still think hearing the words would be amazing.

Overall, I am really excited to see where this series goes. It is clear that Julie Kagawa has created an absolutely intricate world with awe-inspiring characters.

It is something I feel blessed to have read earlier. View all 3 comments. I cannot emphasize enough how descriptive the creatures of the fantasy realm were written.

Among the various fantasy characters we see: On the quest to find the dragon scroll and defeat the spreading army of demons and black magic -while battling their own darkness- the story weaves itself through the lands of dynasties and magic.

Aug 12, Dianne rated it really liked it Shelves: A thousand years before, a wish was granted and the land of Iwagoto suffered.

Now is the time for a new age, a new wish and a new world, but that wish will only be granted to the holder of the Scroll of a Thousand Prayers.

One half-kitsune raised by monks will be tasked with a part of that precious scroll and a quest to find the rest. The fate of her world will rest on her shoulders, but she will not journey alone as an unlikely group of allies join with her, unaware she hides a piece of the pri A thousand years before, a wish was granted and the land of Iwagoto suffered.

The fate of her world will rest on her shoulders, but she will not journey alone as an unlikely group of allies join with her, unaware she hides a piece of the prize.

Mystery abounds, suspense hangs heavy and demonic danger will nip at their heels as good races against evil for the future of the world.

An amazing journey, a captivating read and incredibly likable characters makes this tale a strong foundation for what promises to be an entrancing series!

Shadow of the Fox - Book 1 Publication Date: October 2, Publisher: YA Fantasy Print Length: Jul 09, L. Perry is currently reading it. View all 6 comments.

Jul 09, mo rated it liked it Shelves: Shadow of the Fox has me at a loss for how to review it. The prose and the dialogue, in particular, were the reading equivalent of listening to nails on a chalkboard.

Am I just an alien from another planet, operating on an entirely different wavelength from both Julie Shadow of the Fox has me at a loss for how to review it.

Am I just an alien from another planet, operating on an entirely different wavelength from both Julie Kagawa and all the reviewers who loved Shadow of the Fox?

Am I just a ship passing in the night, completely missing this hype Am I disappointed by this book because I had unrealistic or misguided expectations for it?

Can I even hope to pick apart my complicated feelings of disappointment and ambivalence about this book?

Additionally, one question which I feel is important for me, as a white person, to ask myself is this: Am I harming initiatives to increase diversity in literature by not liking this book?

I love a good slow-burn. It actually reminds me a lot of how the main group in Inuyasha came together, and from my own point of view, it seems like that was the authorial intention.

The pastoral nature imagery, in particular, was well-done and written with a nice balance between simplicity and flowery descriptions.

It was truly a great book- and series-opener, and instantly drew me into the setting though I was initially confused to be reading about a human girl, Suki, rather than a monk-raised kitsune named Yumeko.

I was interested enough in the plot at the end to not completely write off reading future books at the series, despite all the stuff I perceived as flaws in this one.

Now it's time for me to discuss what didn't work for me, at least not completely. I liked her well enough and enjoyed her unflappable optimism.

Sometimes it can be a breath of fresh air to read from the point of view of a genuinely sweet, funny, and hopeful protagonist.

I did feel she was a bit one-note but I would bet money on her having a nice character arc over the course of the series as a whole.

He also, for being an incredible sneaky shinobi, is maybe the most oblivious character in the book. I was waiting for him to have a moment in which he discovers a thing, and it felt like he never bothered to really check on that spoilery thing or investigate it because it was more narratively convenient for him to not do so.

The plot of the novel definitely did her dirty, because she really did feel entirely like the mere ghost of a character. They seemed engaging in the way recognizable anime archetypes can be used to build interesting but familiar first impressions of a character roster.

I don't count that as a bad thing - there are tropes in literally any work of fiction - I just hope they get developed more fully in the future.

I genuinely hope the final published version has some of these edited out. Am I just too picky???

I do think English-speaking otaku will be totally fine with the dialogue or even prefer it like this, though. The good - that it was filled with action scenes and snappy character dynamics.

The bad - the feeling that much of the plot was filler. It read like a compilation volume of a manga with separate, individually-published stories contained within it.

In thinking about this book for several days after finishing it and in the process of writing this review, I mostly just feel like this was a case of misguided expectations on my part.

I blame myself for not enjoying it more. Despite my own misgivings, I definitely think that this will be a fun and engaging read for many, and I encourage you to check it out if its premise or synopsis interests you.

I think this will be an excellent read for a large number of people, and it might be extra exciting for young Japanese-American teens in particular.

Thanks for joining me for another episode of Mo Overthinks Things, and thanks as well for reading all the way to the end if you made it here.

Any quotes are taken from a pre-release copy and may be subject to change in the final published version. Review copy generously provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review Shadow of the Fox was a fun ride through a lush Japanese inspired landscape and not at all what I was expecting!

I loved so much of this story and found it completely entrancing. If you're looking for a thoroughly developed fantasy world, enchanting mythology and lore, morally grey characters, and a centuries old mystery to unravel THIS is the book for you.

Yumi is part human, part kitsune fox in Review copy generously provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review Shadow of the Fox was a fun ride through a lush Japanese inspired landscape and not at all what I was expecting!

Yumi is part human, part kitsune fox in a world that both revers and fears her kind. Raised amongst monks, she has little experience with the outside world but dreams of experiencing everything.

After a massacre upends her whole world, Yumi is thrust into the world she has so dearly mused over. Tatsumi is a samurai and demonslayer, tasked with retrieving an ancient artifact for his clan.

Raised to be cold and unquestioning of his orders, Tatsumi is the perfect warrior, provided he keeps control over his darkness. Fate brings Yumi and Tatsumi together and with similar goals in mind, they choose to travel together.

However, neither has been honest with the other and its only a matter of time before their ruses begin to unravel. From the very first chapter of this story I was absolutely captivated by the world Kagawa has created!

So much happens right from the start, I was totally invested in Suki's story and feeling SO upset for her! Way to reel your readers in!

If you can read it and NOT want to devour the rest of the book, you must be in the worst of all book slumps. Her naivety about the outside world and desire to help everyone is so sweet!

That said, her curiosity and disregard for danger was a little taxing at times. Tatsumi is by-far the most complex and fascinating character in this story.

He's my favorite are we surprised? Tatsumi harbors some very Shadowsinger-esque abilities and I was like: I thoroughly enjoyed how he came to grow fond of Yumi, began to question his own life's path and tried perilously to keep hold of his humanity.

This book also has a great group of supporting characters - such as Suki, Daisuke and Okami! Every character has an important role to play in this story and not one felt like they didn't belong.

I was totally NOT explecting Daisuke to return to the story the way he did and came to adore his chivalry and "deal" with Tatsumi.

Okami's humor and aloofness was exactly what this story needed and he came at the perfect time. Also, the smattering of romance in this never felt forced or unnatural.

This is slow burn and NOT insta-love. There was a natural progression of the primary relationship: If you are looking for a book with a LOT of romance, this is not the book for you.

BUT - if you are looking for a book in which the romance plays a large role on the progression of the story, here you have it! The only things I really didn't like about this was Yumi's character at times and the sometimes confusing name dropping of Japanese mythology and lore.

You will encounter a bunch of Japanese creatures - especially those of the supernatural realm - and it can be a lot to keep up with at first!

Overall, this was a really fantastic novel! Despite having her Iron Fey series on my bookshelves, this was the first time I had read something by Julie Kagawa and she lived up to my expectations!

I NEED to see where it goes after that ending! Sep 07, Kelly Brigid rated it really liked it Shelves: It reminded me of Avatar: The flow of this story felt like a living, breathing anime, and I couldn't have been happier!

Of course I devoured it in a few days! An absolutely wonderful Japanese inspired fantasy with magic, adventure, friendship, and love!

I adore novels that set their characters on quests, where they are forced to overcome smaller obstacles before reaching their final destination.

The tone that Kagawa constructs is simultaneously light hearted and urgent, luring the reader into Yumeko's journey, itching to see what unfolds.

Half Kitsune Fox nature is depicted beautifully. Yumeko is the sweetest, most innocent and kind little bean of them all.

Having grown up in an environment where her Kitsune half is constantly being reprimanded, Yumeko is unsure about who she wishes to identify more as - human or kistune.

These two sides of the same coin flip interchangeably, and I love how it's displayed on the surface. She doesn't wish to harm anyone, but her illusive essence could have more repercussions than she ever realized.

Kage Tatsumi, on the other hand, is a mysterious member of the Shadow Clan, and the bearer of a cursed sword, in which a demon resides. I truly enjoyed reading through his perspective, and witnessing the emotional journey he reluctantly finds himself embarking on.

Despite how he falls under the dark, brooding, male stereotype, I loved him, and am intrigued to see how he shifts the story in the following installments.

The world Julie Kagawa weaves is absolutely stunning. I'm a fairly large fan of anime and Japanese culture, and this gorgeous setting met my every expectation.

What I love about the story and atmosphere, is how it felt as if they were plucked straight out of an anime. It's a remarkably complex world, bubbling over with Japanese folklore and mythology, and I never once doubted its authenticity.

The writing is charming, and not overdone, surprisingly. I also appreciate how distinct Yumeko and Tatsumi's points-of-views are.

It's a shame when two main characters' perspectives are so similar that you can't tell them apart, but thankfully, this issue never arises.

Wonderful themes of we are who we choose to be. A recurring theme throughout this novel, is how we're free to forge our own paths ahead, and deviate from the expectations and limitations others bestow on us.

Yumeko is frightened to reveal her Kitsune half, and keeps this side of herself hidden for the most part.

As the story progresses, it's wonderful to see how she grows as a character and begins to feel more comfortable as both human and Kitsune, in spite of the mockery and scorn others direct at her.

Rather than be bound by her deceptive nature, she embraces it, and utilizes it to protect others. To prevent the demon sword from possessing him, Tatsumi has detained his emotions since he was a child.

So, it arrives as quite a shock, when he begins to exhibit feelings for Yumeko. I love this internal struggle of his between succumbing to or denying his developing feelings.

It's beautiful to see how he, along with Yumeko, steadily realize the truth of human nature, and decide to create their own destinies.

If I love this story so much, why didn't I rate it five stars, you may be wondering? For the entirety of the story, Yumeko travels with Tatsumi, who is a lethal Shinobi.

I find it awfully hard to believe that he never noticed the fact that our dear little fox possessed the scroll. Not only are they in close proximity of one another quite often, but Tatsumi cleans her wounds, and pulls her away from danger on numerous occasions.

Why hadn't Yumeko simply attempted to place an illusion on the scroll? Nonetheless, I still cherish Shadow of the Fox with all my heart, and can't wait to see what happens to my precious babies in the sequel.

I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review! Blog Instagram Twitter Bloglovin Sep 04, Marie rated it it was amazing Shelves: This book requires a great deal of imagination and Google search.

That is if you are unfamiliar with Japanese folklore. Granted, things and creatures mentioned in this book are described. There's even a glossary at the end of the book which I found out too late.

But sometimes, our imagination cannot measure up to the real thing. So if you ever read this book and you have no Find me: So if you ever read this book and you have no idea what different types of yokai and demons are supposed to look like, I encourage you to look things up.

You might get surprised by cute creatures like this. Kamaitachi by Brandon Chang I swear it will make reading this book ten times better.

By the end, you will have a whole anime in your head. This book had everything I wanted. Interesting characters, great world-building, intriguing plot, and engaging writing.

Kitsune, shinobi, yokai, legends about magic scrolls, what more could you ask for? Original art by sXeven. Shared by Julie Kagawa on Facebook.

To me, this book is like an introduction — a way for us to get invested in the story and get to know the characters. I feel that it has barely skimmed the surface and there are more secrets and surprises in store.

BRB, I'm buying more. Review can also be found on my blog. Check out more reviews Perspective of a Writer Raised by monks in the Silent Winds temple, Yumeko has trained all her life to hide her yokai nature.

Whoever holds the scroll will be granted a w Check out more reviews Perspective of a Writer Whoever holds the scroll will be granted a wish.

I got the impression that Yumeko would be a savvy trickster who while innocent is not without her ways She stuck to human form for the most part hiding her fox features with illusion and rarely used her fox fire.

Which was disappointing because I wanted to see a kitsune in action! The story was saved for me by Yumeko's love interest and the other half of this dual POV narrative Tatsumi, aided by a shadowy sword and his shadow clan skills.

In reality the whole deal didn't make a lick of sense and he went along with a bunch of things a little too willingly!

I still found his dark, shadowy and a little broken. He's in a pretty crappy situation and I just felt for him. I think what made me soften toward Yumeko was that I totally shipped these two!

That may sound superficial but this really is a slow burn romance I know, how is that?! Well I loved all the Japanese mythology for one We also gain some other companions I think that is always fun, the more the merrier on a road trip!!

The ronin was perhaps my favorite but we also gain a mysterious masked swordsman, a priestess and a monk This isn't the most creative use of Japanese folklore and there are moments where it feels like something you've read before The mask has nothing to do with the story and doesn't really feel Asian.

The red graphic in the background takes some serious concentration before you work out that it is an outline of pagodas.

It is a cover that would look pretty on a shelf though! What made Shadow of the Fox enjoyable? I love yokai and supernatural beings and there was a lot of effort made to pepper different kinds through their journey.

The kodama were perhaps my favorite! While Yumeko's kitsune abilities didn't wow me they did have their moments. The ronin really was a great addition to Yumeki and Tatsumi's group.

He added this tension that the two of them alone didn't have Right now we accept his place in the story but I can't help thinking his role may be more morally grey than we realize.

The villain for this book is quite fascinating as we learn the different parts of their plan. And there are other powers that be working behind the scenes Possessed swords are pretty much a given for Japanese stories and I really enjoyed the tender hooks that it left me on through the entire story In fact, I'd read the next book just to see how his struggles play out and what Yumeko does about him.

I harp on this idea a lot but characters are motivated due to reasons. And Tatsumi's reason to do whatever Yumeko wanted was because of their deal.

But characters are also motivated by their back history!! Hahaha, didn't expect that, did you!? Tatsumi is a gifted and well, well, well trained shinobi with extreme powers of perception duh he hunts demons and yokai First, she wasn't doing anything to hide the scroll case, it's pretty obvious what is in it hint scroll!

Here he is a liar himself and never suspects that? Never sees it in her clothing? She never talks about putting an illusion on it! This bugged me the entire time!

There are a couple things that are too easy in Shadow of the Fox, but this is a fun road trip full of Japanese mythology and a found family coming together.

Sure, we don't head right for our goal this is a road trip! It has not influenced my opinions. See my special perspective at the bottom of my reviews under the typewriter Please like this review if you enjoyed it!

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Kagawa Blog Video

Talon (1/5) Drachenzeit & (2/5) Drachenherz In thinking about this book for several days after finishing it and in The Secret Code - Mobil6000 process of writing this review, I mostly just feel like this was a case of misguided expectations on my part. The villain for this book is quite fascinating as we learn the different parts of their plan. Shadow of the Fox is a multi-perspective book, and because of that it took me a few chapters to get going, since Die roten bullen login had to meet the main characters first, but once I did I was into it. Please like this pobeda casino if you enjoyed it! These two sides of the same coin flip interchangeably, and I love how it's displayed on the surface. Shadow of the Fox has me at a loss for how to review it. While Yumeko is sweet and open aside from the secrets that she must keep Tatsumi is dark and mysterious. What's more, Dortmund fans' preferred venue for festivities before the German Cup final, the Alexanderplatz, has become synonymous with security since Anis Amri's December new online casino no deposit bonus codes 2019 attack on a Christmas market at the scene. I love her so much. Use casino deutschland grenze schweiz middle 3 lanes to turn slightly left onto S. Yes, yes, authenticity, but it's cheapened by so many anime fanfiction that do the same. Yes, it might have the hero's journey and an fußball heute werder where the main characters kino casino aschaffenburg programm up a Beste Spielothek in Ellighofen finden of misfits as they travel to the capital. Sometimes it can be a breath of fresh air to read from the point of view of a genuinely sweet, funny, and hopeful protagonist. Every character has an important casino texas holdem strategie to play in this story and not one felt like they didn't belong. He's in a pretty crappy situation and I just felt for him.

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